Postconvention workshops are offered after the technical sessions close on Thursday and continue through Friday, 19 October.

Please note that the number of seats available in each session is limited and offered on a first-come, first-served basis. If seats are available, movement between workshops during a session will be permitted.

Workshop passes include access to any or all postconvention workshops.

You can sign up for Postconvention Workshops and more when you register for the SEG Annual Meeting. Only want to attend Postconvention Workshops? Email registration@seg.org to register.


Thursday, 18 October

W-1: Data Analytics and Machine Learning for Geoscience Applications - Part 1
1:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Organizers: Aria Abubakar, Schlumberger; Wenyi Hu, AGT; Weichang Li, Aramco; Ramesh Neelamani, ExxonMobil; Ali Tura, Colorado School of Mines
Email
Through the support of the SEG Research Committee

About this workshop

Through recent decades of intensive research, especially the latest advancements in GPU computing technology and Deep Neural Networks algorithms, machine learning (ML) and artificial intelligence (AI) have now established their great potential in areas such as social networking, e-commerce, computer vision, natural language processing, and robotics. Workflows based on data analytics and machine learning have recently captured the Geoscience community’s attention, as evident in the significantly increased number of related papers presented at international meetings. Early ML solutions to problems such as fault, salt, and other geobody identification, as well as multivariate well log analysis have provided interesting perspectives and promising results.

These observations raise the following questions:

  • What other geoscience problems can be formulated as data analytics and machine learning problems?
  • What is the amount and quality of geoscience data and labels required for data analytics and machine learning to solve these problems? How can modeled synthetic data be beneficial and what's the preferred training and learning strategy (e.g., supervised vs unsupervised, transfer learning, local vs global)?
  • What is the overall performance value (complexity, accuracy and interpretability) expected from data analytics and machine learning relative to existing (physics-based) solutions?
  • What guidance, if any, is available to help design algorithms and model structures given particular types of geoscience problems, such as the network structures in Deep Learning?
  • What are the overall investments (infrastructure, software, expertise) necessary to get started and harvest value from data analytics and machine learning?

These problems are certainly not unique to geoscience. In this workshop we plan to bring experts from both geoscience and AI/ML communities. Through a series of technical presentations and discussions, this workshop will help the SEG community understand and leverage recent developments in data analytics and machine learning. The goal of this workshop is to provide better understanding of the opportunity space for data analytics and machine learning models and algorithms, as well as identify the R&D required to develop these algorithms into technology that works with realistic data sets with high accuracy and reasonable complexity.

W-2: New Technologies to Revolutionize Resolution: Getting more out of the data
1:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Organizers: John Etgen, BP; Ray Abma, BP; Sergio Chavez-Perez, IMP
Email
Through the support of the SEG Research Committee

About this workshop

Improving resolution is one of the most common and critical needs in seismic imaging; it has also been one of the more elusive goals. While there are natural limits to the ultimate potential resolution of seismic reflection images, we believe that current approaches are not reaching those limits. One approach to improving resolution is improving seismic acquisition. This includes broadband acquisition techniques, denser spatial sampling, and improved seismic sensor systems. Another approach is to apply innovative processing techniques. These might include bi-directional decon, spectral decomposition, broadband processing, improved velocity estimates, and so on. Improvements in computational capabilities, new mathematical ideas such as sparse inversion, and the continuous improvements in seismic acquisition may set the stage for significantly increasing the resolution of our seismic images.

W-3: Promises and Challenges in Least Squares Imaging
1:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Organizers: Faqi Liu, PGS; Petr Jilek, BP, Paul Williamson, Total
Email
Through the support of the SEG Research Committee

About this workshop

By posing migration as a linear inverse problem, Least-Squares Migration (LSM) may potentially correct imaging problems due to irregular acquisition geometry, uneven subsurface illumination and even a coloured wavelet. In comparison with conventional imaging algorithms, it can therefore produce images with better amplitude fidelity, fewer migration artifacts and higher resolution. In recent years, the least-squares formalism has been applied to enhance all the main migration algorithms (RTM, WEM and Kirchhoff) in various geological settings. Current implementations divide broadly into two classes - "data domain", involving an iterative migration and demigration process, and "model domain", in which an estimate of the inverse Hessian is applied to a migrated image, via, for example, the use of point spread functions. While the cost of the former is, by construction, at least an order of magnitude greater than that of the underlying migration algorithm, obtaining a good result with current formulations of the latter approach may also be expensive in complex media. Nonetheless the increasing number of case histories in which these techniques have been applied shows that many companies are prepared to pay the price. However, it remains a topic of active research on a number of fronts.

This workshop will provide a forum to share the successes and challenges of Least Squares Migration in its various forms, propose best practices and establish the way forward for the technique. A set of invited talks will review the state of the art and some of the ongoing research in LSM, including work on:

  • more efficient LSM algorithms and implementation strategies
  • tolerance to errors in model parameters and estimated source signatures
  • control of the impact of noise in the data

This will be followed by an extended discussion period offering the chance for all to contribute to a vision of the evolution of this technique and of seismic imaging more generally.

W-4: The Business Value of Multiple Identification and Removal —Status, Challenges, and Road Ahead
1:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Organizers: Emin Sadikhov, Equinor; Fred Hilterman, Geokinetics; Andrew Iverson, University of Calgary; Rob Hegge, Aramco
Email
Through the support of the SEG Research Committee

About this workshop

In seismic processing, we have robust workflows for modelling and prediction of sea surface related multiples in our datasets. Although there are still practical challenges there is a good understanding on how to deal with these types of multiples in production. Most of the challenges are related to sampling of the field, lack of near offset measurements, post-critical and diffracted multiples.

However, internal multiples - defined as multiply reflected events with all reflections occurring below sources and receivers in a surface seismic experiment are usually ignored in production processing of seismic data. Relatively small amplitudes compared to surrounding primaries and poor discrimination, often due to minimal moveout differences are some of the reasons for ignoring them. More than anything and despite continuous development in academic groups, the complexity to predict internal multiples and the challenges in subtracting them without harming primaries have traditionally slowed the practical progress in this field. This is changing now. As we try to better explain our reservoirs and to extract more detail out of our seismic data, internal multiple prediction and removal is becoming more important. For example, reducing uncertainties related to internal multiples can be critical in producing areas where reservoir properties are derived from seismic data and a detailed understanding is required for identification of drilling targets.

In this workshop we would like to bring attention to the business impact of internal multiple prediction and removal technology. We would like to highlight the impact of remnant internal multiples in the data used for interpretation and quantitative analysis.

W-5: Cloud Computing and Deep Learning in Subsurface Exploration
1:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Organizers: Kenton Prindle, Google; Gerard Gorman; Matt Hall, Agile; Felix Herrmann, Georgia Institute of Technology
Email
Through the support of the SEG Research Committee

About this workshop

This session is a deep dive into cloud computing and Deep Learning as enabling technologies for Oil and Gas. It will focus on techniques and algorithms based on Subsurface and transfer learning from other industries that can be leveraged to accelerate learning and adoption of deep learning and cloud for subsurface applications.

W-6: Fit for Purpose Practical Monitoring of Producing Reservoirs and CO2 Sequestration
1:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Organizers: Hesham Ebaid, Shell; Mariana Gherasim, BP; Colin MacBeth, Heriot-Watt University; Michel Verliac, Total
Email
Through the support of the SEG Research Committee

About this workshop

Among many challenges facing the huge need for increasing our hydrocarbon recovery and monitoring of injected fluids for safe disposal is a cost effective, practical, areal reservoir surveillance technology. In the lower oil price environment that now forms part of our working environment, surveillance must be smart, cheap and practical. Access to new resources is becoming harder and production decline is shadowing most of our mature assets. Thus, the need for better management through surveillance technologies is badly needed. In this workshop, we will discuss:

  • new technology advancements in reservoir surveillance
  • example from assets with smart, cheap and practical reservoir surveillance
  • cross comparison between producing fields, injection efficiency and containment
  • where is the balance between cheap and effective reservoir surveillance
  • out-of-the-box ideas and technologies that can be implemented in reservoir surveillance

This workshop will facilitate an open discussion among operators, vendors and academia about their experiences. We will explore potential ways forward for generating value in a fit-for-purpose flow that meets our demands in the current economic environmen.

W-7: Cost Efficient Acquisition in Seismic
1:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Organizers: Adriana Ramirez, Equinor; Ray Abma, BP
Email
Through the support of the SEG Research Committee

About this workshop

Seismic surveys are expensive. We face the competing priorities of lowering survey costs and obtaining higher resolution seismic images. Nevertheless, innovative methods of acquiring and processing seismic data are allowing lower cost per square mile while maintaining seismic image quality or even improving it. There have been significant innovations in seismic source and receiver technologies. This workshop will review recent advances and proposed methods for improving seismic surveys. These will include new sources, simultaneous sourcing, advances in receiver technologies, operations, regulations, and processing methods.

W-8: Integrated Imaging
1:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Organizers: Ed Biegert, Shell; Neda Bundalo, Anadarko; Irina Filina, University of Nebraska; Vicki Tschirhart, NRCan; Luise Sander, Sander Geophysics
Email
Through the support of the SEG Gravity and Magnetics Committee

About this workshop

Cost-effective imaging of the subsurface requires rapid integration of different geophysical measurements with geological control and insights to generate actionable information. Multi-modal, multi-scale data sets constrained by geology can speed up the cycle time, reduce the cost, and improve the confidence of our images and interpretation of the subsurface.

Are we using the right tools and data sets to solve the problems? Do we understand why and how to use them? Can we improve the image, optimize our workflows, and provide results efficiently at lower cost?

The workshop is an attempt to answer these questions through audience interaction, brainstorming, and presentations. Presentations could include using gravity, magnetics, and electromagnetics in seismic processing, velocity analysis, full waveform inversion, and enhanced / improved imaging. Topics could include multi-sensor acquisition, multi-modal inversion, new algorithms, and best practices for using gravity gradiometry. We are interested in how these methods can support, integrate, and add value to seismic processing and imaging in difficult-to-explore geology.

Major goals of this highly interactive workshop are

  1. explore the non-seismic toolbox
  2. highlight real examples of integrated projects that benefitted (or not) from the non-seismic data
  3. provide a learning opportunity for geoscientists from all backgrounds to see how they might optimize the value of their imaging projects via integration with relatively low-cost non-seismic methods

W-9: Highlights from SEAM

Organizers: Maria Angela Capello, Kuwait Oil Company
Through the support of SEAM

This workshop has been cancelled.

W-10: Electromagnetic Applications using Metallic Well Casing
1:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Organizers: Michael Wilt, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Evan Um, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Lindsey Heagy, University of British Columbia
Email
Through the support of the SEG Research Committee

About this workshop

For a number of years workers have explored the use Electromagnetic (EM) and Electrical methods for using metallic well casing to interrogate deeper into the formation. Although the casing offers access to targets of interest the physical properties of the casing make it challenging to use EM and electrical technologies. Recent applications include theoretical and field studies where casing is used as a source antenna and receivers are deployed within pipes or consist of the pipes themselves. In addition recent proposals have addressed using EM technology for interrogating the casing itself in the search for corroded patches and subsurface breaks.

In this workshop we examine the present level of technology for using well casing in geophysical applications and explore technical and physical barriers for the advancement of these methods. If these barriers can be overcome the use of casing can greatly expand the reach of EM technologies to solve a number of problems.

W-11: Review of Porphyry Cu-Au-Mo Deposits; Geology, Exploration and Development
1:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Organizers: Ken Witherly, Condor Consulting
Email
Through the support of the SEG Mining Committee

About this workshop

Porphyry deposits typically host large amounts of copper, gold and molybdenum and so have been long-sought after geological targets. While still important targets, recent history shows that due to the cost to develop and complexity to operate profitably can be a challenge. These factors can result in very long development times with periods of >50 years from discovery to mining being not uncommon. As smaller, higher grade resources are exhausted however, porphyry deposits at increasing depth will likely remain a major component of highly prized targets for mining.

This workshop will review the following aspects of porphyry exploration and development:

  1. Geological aspects and mining
  2. Exploration technology
  3. Case studies
  4. The future of porphyry exploration and development

W-12: Advances in Geophysical Tomographic Methods
1:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Organizers: Erasmus Oware, University of Buffalo; Jan van der Kruk, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH; Jinsong Chen, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Anh Tran, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Email
Through the support of the SEG Near-Surface Geophysics Technical Section

About this workshop

Geophysical tomography is increasingly becoming an indispensable tool to the geoscientist for inferring spatially continuous subsurface properties and processes. While the last two decades have witnessed tremendous advances in geophysical tomographic methods, the challenges of solution non-uniqueness resulting from limited, noisy observations coupled with incomplete understanding of the target phenomenon still hamper our ability to accurately infer subsurface models from geophysical measurements.

The objective of this workshop is to assemble experts in the field of geophysical tomography to discuss the challenges and advances in geophysical tomographic methods. Topics worthy of discussion include, but are not limited to: advances in regularization strategies, data error modeling, uncertainty quantification, model order reduction techniques, methods for evaluation of data worth, full waveform inversion, etc..

W-13: Integrated Geophysics and Geomechanics for Conventional Field Development and Production
1:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Organizers: Reynaldo Cardona, Chevron; Andrew Royle, Chevron; Alan Cohen, Department of Energy; Mariana Gherasim, BP
Email
Through the support of the SEG Development and Production Committee

About this workshop

There is still a lot of uncertainties and ongoing research about which workflows and theories should be used for both conventionals and unconventionals reservoir surveillance/monitoring.

Friday, 19 October 2018

W-14: Recent Advances in Remote Sensing Technologies for Hydrocarbon Exploration and Environmental Evaluation
8:30 am - 12:00 pm

Organizers: Yongyi Li, Shell; Roice Nelson, Dynamic Measurement; Michael Verliac, Total; William Jeffery, CGG; Doug Foster, University of Texas at Austin; Dominque Dubucq, Total
Email
Through the support of the SEG Research Committee

About this workshop

This workshop will discuss recent advances and future directions of remote sensing technologies in onshore and offshore hydrocarbon exploration and environmental evaluation, including space- and air-borne systems, underwater sonar, passive lightning, LiDAR applications, and other remote sensing technologies for oil and gas seepage mapping, seabed mapping and characterization, drilling site and oil and gas field evaluation, natural gas leak detection, as well as reservoir monitoring and geohazard analysis. The workshop will be organized by discussion of the following key topics:

  1. Onshore applications
    • hydrocarbon exploration
    • oil and gas seepage mapping
    • reservoir monitoring
    • drilling site and oil and gas field evaluation
  2. Offshore applications
    • hydrocarbon exploration
    • oil and gas seepage mapping
    • seafloor mapping and characterization
    • geohazards analysis
  3. New technologies
    • space- and air-borne systems
    • underwater sonar
    • passive lightning
    • LiDAR applications
    • regional and local database updating
    • other related remote sensing technologies

W-15: Leveraging the Value of SEAM Models: What has been done and what is the future potential?
8:30 am - 12:00 pm

Organizers: Maria Angela Capello, Kuwait Oil Company; Cengiz Esmersoy, Schlumberger; Konstantin Osypov, Chevron; Yafei Wu, Anadarko
Email
Through the support of SEAM and the SEG Research Committee

About this workshop

The SEG Advanced Modeling (SEAM) program has started in 2007 and produced a number of earth models with seismic simulation to help understand some industry challenges including subsalt, land challenges, pore-pressure, and time-lapse reservoir monitoring. The models and seismic data were provided to the member companies of each SEAM project with rights to use the model and simulated data for any internal purpose or publications if desired. Data were also made available to others for a fee after a certain period of time. The theme of this workshop is to discuss what the SEAM model & data have been used for, what was learned, and what are the opportunities for doing more going forward. We will invite the member companies to participate in the workshop, present their work, and participate in the discussions.

W-16: Marine Vibrator Technology for Seismic Acquisition
8:30 am - 12:00 pm

Organizers: Andrew Feltham, Total; Bill Pramik, Pramik Consulting; Richard Verm, Geokinetics
Email
Through the support of the SEG Research Committee

About this workshop

This workshop will review the current state of Marine Vibroseis technology. Existing and emerging marine vibrator designs will be reviewed along with data examples and technical discussions. Marine Vibrators bring a level of source control to the marine environment not available with conventional marine seismic sources. Control over the length, bandwidth and signal type of the seismic source become possible with Marine Vibroseis. This ability, along with other well-known advantages of Vibroseis acquisition opens the door to discussions regarding new methods of marine seismic acquisition never before possible.

The goal of this workshop is to update the industry on the status of marine vibrator technology and highlight some of the potential advantages for marine seismic data acquisition. As Marine Vibroseis systems reach commercial application, survey design geophysicists must maximize the acquisition efficiency and data quality potential of Marine Vibroseis, and data processing methods that take full advantage of the marine vibroseis source need to enter into future discussions.

W-17: Data Analytics and Machine Learning for Geoscience Applications - Part 2
8:30 am - 5:00 pm

Organizers: Aria Abubakar, Schlumberger; Wenyi Hu, AGT; Weichang Li, Aramco; Ramesh Neelamani, ExxonMobil; Ali Tura, Colorado School of Mines
Email
Through the support of the SEG Research Committee

About this workshop

Through recent decades of intensive research, especially the latest advancements in GPU computing technology and Deep Neural Networks algorithms, machine learning (ML) and artificial intelligence (AI) have now established their great potential in areas such as social networking, e-commerce, computer vision, natural language processing, and robotics. Workflows based on data analytics and machine learning have recently captured the Geoscience community’s attention, as evident in the significantly increased number of related papers presented at international meetings. Early ML solutions to problems such as fault, salt, and other geobody identification, as well as multivariate well log analysis have provided interesting perspectives and promising results.

These observations raise the following questions:

  • What other geoscience problems can be formulated as data analytics and machine learning problems?
  • What is the amount and quality of geoscience data and labels required for data analytics and machine learning to solve these problems? How can modeled synthetic data be beneficial and what's the preferred training and learning strategy (e.g., supervised vs unsupervised, transfer learning, local vs global)?
  • What is the overall performance value (complexity, accuracy and interpretability) expected from data analytics and machine learning relative to existing (physics-based) solutions?
  • What guidance, if any, is available to help design algorithms and model structures given particular types of geoscience problems, such as the network structures in Deep Learning?
  • What are the overall investments (infrastructure, software, expertise) necessary to get started and harvest value from data analytics and machine learning?

These problems are certainly not unique to geoscience. In this workshop we plan to bring experts from both geoscience and AI/ML communities. Through a series of technical presentations and discussions, this workshop will help the SEG community understand and leverage recent developments in data analytics and machine learning. The goal of this workshop is to provide better understanding of the opportunity space for data analytics and machine learning models and algorithms, as well as identify the R&D required to develop these algorithms into technology that works with realistic data sets with high accuracy and reasonable complexity.

W-18: Frontier FWI: From Academic Research to Cutting Edge Industrial Solutions
8:30 am - 5:00 pm

Organizers: Alison Malcolm, Memorial University; Ola Kristoffer Øye, Equinor; Paul Williamson, Total; Uwe Albertin, Chevron
Email
Through the support of the SEG Research Committee

About this workshop

Full waveform inversion (FWI) is now an established velocity model building technique in the oil and gas industry. It is used in both exploration and production contexts, and continues to deliver velocity models of unprecedented resolution and detail. However, typical FWI applications are still dominated by P-wave velocity updates driven by diving and refracted waves; extending methods to update anisotropy and visco-elastic parameters by taking the full wavefield into account is still an active research area in both academia and industry.

This workshop will focus on current and emerging FWI research themes, with particular emphasis on how to efficiently transform research results into industrial solutions. FWI became a successful industrial tool after initial strong contributions from academia which were picked up and built on by the industrial community. We would like to highlight current research initiatives on both sides and facilitate a discussion and sharing of experiences of academia/industry technology transfer in FWI.

Topics of the workshop will cover:

  • How is frontier research from academia and industry currently making its way into industrial FWI solutions?
  • Case histories of transferring academic FWI research to industrial solutions
  • How can academia and industry collaborate more efficiently to facilitate discovery of new techniques, development and technological transfer? At what stage of technology development should this transfer occur given the potentially high computational demands of significant demonstrations?
  • What model of collaboration with academic R&D yields best results for industry? What can academia offer that industrial research efforts cannot?
  • New and ongoing research directions in topics such as:
    • Elastic FWI
    • Onshore FWI
    • 4D FWI
    • Reflection FWI
    • Anisotropic parameter estimation
    • New acquisition techniques and their impact on FW

W-19: Understanding Unconventionals: Rock Physics, Geomechanics and Seismic
8:30 am - 5:00 pm

Organizers: Ali Tura, Colorado School of Mines; Dan Ebrom, Equinor; Azra Tutuncu, Colorado School of Mines; Ulrich Zimmer, Shell; Reynaldo Cardona, Chevron; Jim Gaiser, GGC; Andrew Royle, Chevron; Yongyi Li, Shell
Email
Through the support of the SEG Research Committee

About this workshop

Is the Shale revolution getting away from geophysics or are we inventing new methods to address key issues? How does geophysics fit into the cost cutting in the industry? In this workshop we focus on the value geophysics is bringing to exploration and development of unconventional reservoirs. We are also interested to discuss deficiencies and discuss ways forward for resolving these issues.

The workshop will be organized by discussion of key value topics for optimizing:

  1. Drilling locations (""sweet-spotting"") - Where to drill a well
  2. Landing depth - How to drill a single well
  3. Drilling direction - How to drill a single well
  4. Lateral length - How to drill a single well
  5. Completion design - How to complete a single well
  6. Well spacing - Where to put the next well

In addition to going over current and experimental technologies we will discuss:

  • What do we mean by 'optimization’?
  • How would we decide without any geophysics?
  • What alternatives to geophysical data exist?
  • How does geophysics improve decisions?
  • How have these interpretations/applications of geophysics been validated?
  • What are the remaining issues in applying geophysics?
  • How do we potentially overcome these issues?

W-20: DAS: Validating Measurements, Developing Processing Methods, and Integrating to Optimize Velocity Models for Improving Subsurface Imaging
8:30 am - 5:00 pm

Organizers: Yingping Li, Shell; Martin Karrenbach, Optasense; Ge Zhan, BP; Juan Wang, Shell; Michel Verliac, Total; Yongyi Li, University of Alberta; Mark Willis, Halliburton; Vanessa Brown, Chevron
Email
Through the support of the SEG Research Committee

About this workshop

Technological developments and applications of Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) are growing fast in the oil and gas, geothermal, and mining industries with more and more DAS development and applications expected in the near future. With many DAS projects being carried out worldwide, the industry has accumulated large amounts of DAS big data. However, we still face challenges on understanding the vector fidelity, directivity, and sensitivity of DAS measurements. The first topic of the workshop will focus on understanding, using and/or avoiding the features of DAS instrumentation. The second topic will focus on the processing methods used to deal with the large volumes of DAS “big” data that we have acquired. These acquired data sets include DAS-VSP, micro-seismic DAS, and surface seismic DAS data. Efficient and effective processing techniques will help us extract useful information from large volumes of DAS data and demonstrate the value of all DAS applications. We encourage contributors to show various examples of applying newly developed processing methods to extract big values from DAS data.

The third topic of the workshop will include integrating DAS data with borehole seismic (VSP), surface seismic, and wireline logging data to diagnose and optimize velocity models and improve subsurface imaging. In the oil and gas industry, we apply seismic imaging methods using accurate velocity models to create accurate and clear images of subsurface structures. Therefore, finding the best possible velocity model is crucial. Traditionally, we used conventional borehole seismic (VSP) and wireline logging data to diagnose and constrain velocity models derived from FWI and tomographic inversions of surface seismic data. However, the sparseness of the well data provides great challenges for diagnosing and constraining velocity models. Advanced DAS technology has been shown to be a new and powerful tool for further constraining the velocity field and improving subsurface imaging, thus reducing the drilling uncertainties. These new technologies also provide opportunities for joint inversions of both DAS and surface seismic data. We expect contributors to present their findings to show how to integrate DAS-VSP, logging, and surface seismic data to constrain velocity models and improve subsurface imaging. We also propose to reduce the number of talks, but increase the time for discussion and interaction between the speakers and the audience.

W-21: Natural Field EM for Mineral Exploration
8:30 am - 5:00 pm

Organizers: Jean Legault, Geotech Ltd.; Alan Jones; Joel Jansen
Email
Through the support of the SEG Mining Committee

About this workshop

Natural field EM methods are among the most powerful tools for resolving complete mineral systems Over the past decade, natural field EM methods have become mainstream in mineral exploration, gaining more acceptance by users in the mineral exploration community. This is in large part due to advances in instrumentation and their increased use by commercial providers, as well as availability of 2D and 3D inversion codes, and, more importantly, mineral exploration case histories involving natural field EM. Inspired by a paper on natural field EM presented at Exploration ’17, our day-long workshop will review advances in ground and airborne data acquisition and processing, instrumentation, modeling and inversion, and interpretation - culminating in case studies gathered from a wide variety mineral exploration applications from around the world.

W-22: Advances in Unmanned Airborne System (UAS) Geophysics
8:30 am - 5:00 pm

Organizers: John Lane, USGS; Nathan Campbell, Oklahoma State University
Email
Through the support of the SEG Near-Surface Geophysics Technical Section

About this workshop

The use of unmanned systems (UAS), or drones, to support subsurface properties and processes. The ability of UAS to rapidly acquire high-resolution geo-referenced data with little or no environmental impact is driving platform and sensor innovation and already impacting how geophysical surveys are planned and executed.

At this workshop, leaders in the design and operation of UAS platforms and sensors will showcase recent advances in the field. Case-histories will be provided by experts using UAS to support a wide range of geophysical survey methods (magnetic, electromagnetic, gravity, gamma ray spectrometry. Ground penetrating radar, and seismic). The workshop will provide attendees with an overview of the UAS state-of-the-art for geophysical mapping applications and insights into developments, trends, and issues affecting this rapidly growing field.

W-23: Frequency Dependent Seismic Analysis including Processing and Modeling and Interpretation
8:30 am - 5:00 pm

Organizers: Dhananjay Kumar, BP; Mark Chapman, University of Edinburgh; Doug Foster, University of Texas at Austin; Kui Bao, Shell; Yi Shen, Shell; Wenyi Hu, AGT; Tieyuan Zhu, Penn State University
Email
Through the support of the SEG Research Committee

About this workshop

Frequency dependent seismic analysis is critical for reservoir characterization. Seismic attributes like instantaneous frequency and red, green, and blue (RGB) blending of three frequency components have been successfully used in qualitative interpretation. With the advancement in seismic acquisition and processing, seismic amplitudes are being used for more quantitative interpretation in terms of rock and fluid properties. The AVO equations have been extended to include frequency dependency, allowing exploitation of frequency attributes for quantitative reservoir characterization. Frequency-dependent reflectivity can arise either from intrinsic attenuation or scattering (due to heterogeneity in reservoir layers), and different rock physics and seismic modeling approaches can be used as a basis for modeling and inversion. The quality of seismic analysis will depend on the quality of input seismic amplitude at the reservoir level.

Seismic amplitude is affected by attenuation (often described in terms of Q). Seismic attenuation causes frequency dependent amplitude loss, i.e., reduced signal to noise, phase distortions because of frequency dependent velocity dispersion, and frequency dependent reflectivity. For example, gas chimneys common in offshore South-East Asia cause poor seismic imaging and resolution, if not addressed. This causes challenges for velocity model building, structural interpretation, and quantitative amplitude interpretation. Much progress has been made on seismic attenuation modeling, tomography and imaging. Petro-physical lab measurements and theoretical rock physics models may also help create a link between seismic attenuation and rock properties, and help build models. However, the gaps between theoretical developments and the complexity of field data still create challenges in practice.

This one-day workshop will focus on attenuation model building and imaging in the morning, and rock physics and seismic interpretation in the afternoon. We will discuss the pros and cons of existing methods, as well as challenges and opportunities for advancing the frequency dependent seismic technology.

Specific topics for discussion:

  1. Imaging issues examples due to attenuation
  2. Q model building – from seismic, VSP, well logs, core
  3. Seismic attenuation compensation in imaging
  4. Rock physics modeling to study attenuation
  5. Seismic modeling, including AVO
  6. Seismic analysis and interpretation – frequency dependent.

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