Workshops

Postconvention workshops are offered after the technical sessions close on Thursday and continue through Friday. 

Workshop passes are available for US $100 for member, US $200 for nonmembers, and US $30 for students and include access to any or all post-convention workshops.

When registering please indicate which workshop sessions you are most likely to attend. Please note that the number of seats available in each session is limited and offered on a first-come, first-served basis. If seats are available, movement between workshops during a session will be permitted.

Thursday, 20 October

1:30-5:00 p.m.
Organizers: Vanessa Brown, Sven Treitel, Felix J. Herrmann and Partha Routh
E-mail contact: vbrown@chevron.com 
Through the support of the SEG Research Committee

Seismic inversion is an ill-posed problem. All currently used inversion algorithms are at best approximations. As a result, we face the problem that many models of the subsurface produce synthetic data, all of which fit the data within a given measure of error. In this workshop we ask what are and what can be appropriate uses of this rapidly evolving FWI technology? What are and will remain inherent limitations when applied in practical setting?  We have a set of invited speakers discussing methodologies such as, but not limited to, current FWI applications, elastic FWI, global methods, constrained methods, alternative objective functions and micro seismic.

Program

Part 1

Walking a decade in the FWI’s shoes by Denes Vigh (Schlumberger)

Beyond local FWI by Mike Warner (Imperial College London)

Revealing overburden and reservoir complexity with high-resolution FWI by Rongrong Lu (ExxonMobil)

An optimal transport distance for full waveform inversion: an attempt to mitigate cycle skipping by L. Métivier, R. Brossier, Q. Mérigot, E. Oudet, and J. Virieux (SEISCOPE)

Computational Issues in Extended Waveform Inversion by Bill Symes (Rice University)

1:30-5:00 p.m.
Organizers: John Etgen, B. Wang and P. Sava
E-mail contact: john.etgen@bp.com 
Through the support of the SEG Research Committee

This workshop aims to improve our understanding of the sources of uncertainty in seismic imaging and the impact that uncertainty has on seismic images and the subsurface descriptions created from them. Everyone who uses seismic images to make business decisions knows that seismic images and the information derived from them are not unambiguous, and that there is always a range of possible interpretations and inferences that can be made. Despite that, quantifying or even qualifying uncertainty seems to be an immature part of our discipline and how we work and communicate our results.

Everyone who has worked in seismic imaging has heard questions like “How accurate is the depth of this reflector?  How good are these velocity estimates?  How robust is this structural closure given the velocity uncertainty we expect in this area? How much does velocity uncertainty affect the volumetrics of this trap? How mispositioned could this fault be?”

This workshop will embrace both theoretical and practical discussions of how to improve our understanding of the presence and impact of uncertainties in seismic imaging.

Questions potentially addressed by workshop speakers:

“How does uncertainty manifest itself in the full cycle of depth imaging?”

“How does depth prediction accuracy degrade with depth?”

“What is the real-world impact of seismic image uncertainty, how much is at stake for the oil and gas business? “

“Is there a systematic framework that allows us to communicate uncertainty effectively?”

“How can we better communicate uncertainty to work that follows seismic imaging? “

1:30-5:00 p.m.
Organizers: Mariana Gherasim, Jean-Paul van Gestel, Paul Hatchell and Christian Hubans
E-mail contact: Mariana.Gherasim@bp.com 
Through the support of the SEG Research Committee

Time-lapse (4D) seismic studies have become a key component of reservoir monitoring. Analysis of 4D seismic data allows us to better understand production-related changes in fluid saturation and pressure, evaluate reservoir compartmentalization, and select better locations for infill or injection wells. Lessons learned from various projects around the world suggest that time-lapse information has added significant economic benefits including in deep-water environment. While reservoir rock properties are considered to be a key requirement, the quality of seismic data is also essential. There is an ongoing effort in minimizing the 4D noise by attempting to acquire perfectly repeated seismic surveys via permanent installations or ROV-deployed nodes. This workshop will review examples of offshore and onshore case studies, and provide an understanding of the value gained by integrating the 4D data into the reservoir characterization workflow.

1:30-5:00 p.m.
Organizers: Oswaldo Davogustto Cataldo, Scott Taylor, Werner Heigl, and Yoram Shoham
E-mail contact: o.cataldo@shell.com 
Through the support of the SEG Research Committee

Microseismic events literally scan the reservoir from within, and their spatial and temporal distribution offer a unique opportunity to characterize the reservoir as it undergoes treatment and production.  It is clear that micro-seismicity indicates a changing state in the reservoir but it is unclear to what degree typical reservoir properties are affected and whether these changes can be detected, measured and quantified into additional valuable reservoir understanding.  Encouraged by promising results in estimating shear wave birefringence, permeability, Young’s Modulus, Poisson’s ratio, velocity anisotropy and sub-seismic fracture images we seek to capture the present state of the art in this field and pose meaningful questions to the community.  The workshop will start with a keynote presentation from Serge Shapiro and shall be supported by an interactive discussion by attendees on selected topics relevant to validating and establishing incremental value from microseismic data. Some of the key questions we would like to address in the workshop are:

  1. I have microseismic data, what can I do with it in terms on reservoir characterization?
  2. How does microseismic reservoir characterization impact my business?
  3. What other types of data do I need to enhance the value of my microseismic data?
  4. What acquisition geometry is required to extract a given reservoir property?
  5. Surface seismic and well logs are used for inversion work. These measurements are made at different scales.  We have proven workflows to tune and tie these data together.  Downhole microseismic sits in the middle. Could we integrate microseismic data into an inversion workflow?  If yes, how do we validate this?
  6. Wide azimuth surface seismic measures two way travel times and estimates vertical and horizontal velocity anisotropy.  Downhole microseismic can measure one-way direct horizontal velocity anisotropy for P, Sh, and Sv.  What incremental value could we gain from these measurements for surface seismic processing?
  7. What has been done by industry so far? Workflows and standards
  8. What hasn’t been done?
  9. What are we missing?
  10. Where are the main knowledge gaps?

1:30-5:00 p.m.
Organizers: Stewart A. Levin and Tracy Stark
E-mail contact: stew@sep.stanford.edu 
Through the support of the SEG Research Committee

An industry workhorse for fluid and lithology discrimination in the previous century, AVO emerged into a new era of challenges and directions with the geophysical industry focusing on anisotropy and full wave inversion (FWI) in this current century.  This workshop will discuss any new developments in the use of amplitude versus offset, angle and azimuth. We are interested in hearing about any new algorithms, display methods, applications of the technology, and, if tastefully done, new commercial software or workflows. Insights connecting AVO with FWI and applications such as machine learning for interpreting AVO in complex settings are welcomed. The workshop will end with an audience participation period to discuss what was presented and what, if anything, could be done to improve the utilization of the technology.

1:30-5:00 p.m.
Organizers: Sean Walker
E-mail contact: walker@cwgeophysics.ca 
Through the support of the SEG Mining and Geothermal Committee

This workshop will cover the current state of the art and future of autonomous geophysics. The topics discussed by our panel of speakers will include geophysical measurements from unmanned aerial, terrestrial and aquatic autonomous platforms. Presentations will focus on the challenges, regulatory and technical, involved with autonomous operations as well as the benefits that can be gained. Novel applications beyond mineral exploration geophysics will also be presented. The workshop has been planned to facilitate the sharing of information and to generate discussion about this exciting topic.

1:30-5:00 p.m.
Ticketed Event: $30/student, $100/member, $200/non-member, free flow permitted
Organizers: Hendratta Ali, Eve Sprunt and Manika Prasad
E-mail contact: hnali@fhsu.edu 
Through the support of the SEG Women’s Networking Committee

Tickets for this event can be purchased online or at main registration only.

This workshop will focus on discussing and providing tips for navigating the workplace when there is bias and bullying. It will offer strategies for dealing with the offender without triggering backlash. This workshop is timely because in the last couple of years, the industries and institutions that focus on oil and gas exploration/production have suffered significant down-sizing due to the ongoing oil burst. This inevitably increases anxiety and job security concerns in the workforce, leading to unhealthy competition which can trigger increased hostility in the work place for everyone particularly junior staff members, under-represented minorities and female professionals. This workshop which will be led by from an expert sociologist, Prof. Sheryl Skaggs. She will provide participants with tips and strategies for navigating challenges associated with bullying and bias through real life examples and role play.  Due to the sensitive nature of the subject, this workshop will operated in accordance with the Chatham House Rule, which means participants are free to use the information received, but neither the identity nor the affiliation of the speaker(s), nor that of any other participant, may be revealed. Chatham House Rule is invoked to encourage openness and the sharing of information.

Topics:

  • Overview of workplace bullying and bias
  • Interactive activities: group discussions and role play
  • How to deal with bias and bullying in a constructive fashion?

This workshop will operated in accordance to Chatham House Rule, which means the following: When a meeting, or part thereof, is held under Chatham House Rule, participants are free to use the information received, but neither the identity nor the affiliation of the speaker(s), nor that of any other participant, may be revealed. Chatham House Rule is invoked to encourage openness and the sharing of information.

Speaker/Facilitator:

Dr. Sheryl Skaggs is professor of sociology in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences (EPPS) at the University of Texas at Dallas.  Her research primarily focuses on workplace diversity among racial/ethnic minorities and women, particularly within managerial and executive positions. Her research has been published in the American Sociological Review, American Journal of Sociology, Annual Review of Sociology, Gender and Society, Social Problems, Social Science Research and several other journals. She received funding from the National Science Foundation for her joint research on women corporate board membership and executive representation. Dr. Skaggs is currently working on a project examining work-life balance of women and men in Fortune 500 companies.

1:30-5:00 p.m.
Organizers: Ed Biegert, Vsevolod Egorov, Irina Filina and Maria Hanciuc
E-mail contact: ed.biegert@shell.com 
Through the support of the SEG Gravity and Magnetics Committee

In today’s economics we are facing low commodity prices, oversupply of some natural resources, and high operational costs leading to reduced exploration activities throughout the oil & gas and mining industries with major budget and workforce cuts.  Operational efficiency and return on investment become critical in this environment.

Are we using the right tools to solve the problems? Do we understand why we use them? Can learning from the past experience help us to improve in the future, optimize our workflows, and provide results efficiently at the lower cost?

The workshop is an attempt to answer these questions through audience interaction, brainstorming, and presentations. Case histories from oil & gas, mining, and environmental/engineering industries will focus on potential field applications and their integration with other methods. Major goals of this highly interactive workshop are (1) outline the methods in the non-seismic toolbox, and discusses their strengths and weaknesses, (2) highlight real examples of integrated projects that benefitted (or not) from the non-seismic data, (3) provide a learning opportunity for geoscientists from all backgrounds to see how they might optimize the value of their projects via integration with relatively low-cost non-seismic methods.

1:30-5 p.m.
Organizer: Gail Adams
E-mail contact: gail.adams@iagc.org 

The oil and gas industry has seen a proliferation of environmental regulations around the world over the past few years, and the trend does not appear to be diminishing in the near future.  In this milieu, it is critical that the geophysics community understands the magnitude of the issue and how to navigate mounting regulation and address misinformation.

Anti-oil and gas development organizations are passionately working to ban offshore drilling and have set their sights on the geophysical industry to meet their goal.  In their words, seismic surveys are the “gateway drug to drilling.”  Many of these organizations regularly engage in misinformation campaigns in an effort to sway public opinion away from support of the oil and gas industry and toward support of other types of energy. 

Unfortunately, much of this misinformation finds its way into regulatory regimes around the world. This often results in the enacting of overly-precautionary measures that are not based on science nor risk, but have significant consequences for the use of geophysical survey technology, whether for research or exploration.

Navigating Regulation & Misinformation: Advancing the Geophysical Industry in a Complex Regulatory Environment will examine global regulatory developments and trends and the importance of understanding the complexities of an ever-increasing restrictive regulatory environment. It will also provide helpful guidance on successfully navigating these complexities in a time of reduced resources within the industry.

This engaging and informative session also will review recent significant published research and research in progress and provide information on how that research can be used to combat the impact of misinformation and better inform regulators and stakeholders to help ensure the geophysical industry’s continued license to operate. 

Friday, 21 October

8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Organizers: Henri Houllevigue, Aria Abubakar and Norm Allegar
E-mail contact: henri.houllevigue@total.com 
Through the support of the SEG Research Committee

The main objective in geophysics is to obtain quantitative estimates of subsurface rock properties and fluid content of earth models at different scales, such as petrophysical and reservoir models for exploration, formation evaluation and reservoir monitoring. The integration of geophysical measurements such as seismic, electromagnetic, gravity, production data at well-bore and reservoir scale using multi-physics inversion and/or interpretation method can reduce the uncertainties in the models that we obtain. Hence, it will help one to make better reservoir management decision. In this workshop we will review the current status of the multi-physics inversion/interpretation method and their applications, as well as the research of new workflows and emerging techniques. The following themes are expected to be addressed: Joint inversion/imaging methodology, Joint interpretation workflows, and field case examples to show advantages and disadvantageous of these methods and workflows.

8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Organizers: Yingping Li, Martin Karrenbach, Ge Zhan, Thomas Daley, Michel Verliac and Ali Tura
E-mail contact: Yingping.li@shell.com 
Through the support of the SEG Research Committee

As distributed fiber-optic (FO) sensing technology has matured, our industry has accumulated an increasing amount of distributed data (e.g. DAS-VSP and DTS) from FO cables, as well as point fiber sensors (e.g. 3-C fiber optic accelerometers). In this workshop we will discuss improvements and recent advances of FO technology, how it is being used in the oilfield, and some novel applications. Topics will include: Uses of FO technology in borehole completions, 4D/3D DAS-VSP processing, velocity mode updating and imaging from single and multiple wells, water bottom multiples in DAS, interferometry or virtual source imaging with DAS data, as well as applications in microseismic monitoring. Advances in cable design, including helical cable for increased directional sensitivity, impact both borehole and surface acquisition. This workshop will provide opportunities to learn about recent advances in FO technology as applied to the oilfield and to discuss challenges we encounter during survey design, modeling, deployment, acquisition, processing and interpretation. An important aspect that will be discussed is what business value different FO technologies bring to oilfield applications.

8:30 a.m.-12 p.m.
Organizers: Hesham Ebaid, J.R. La Follett, Y. Xue, C. McBeth and C. Hubans
E-mail contact: h.ebaid@shell.com 
Through the support of the SEG Research Committee

Reservoir surveillance can provide value by improving recovery through better quality production and development decisions. However when oil prices remain low for extended periods, an emphasis must be made on reducing the cost of surveillance and improving the return on any investment in surveillance data acquisition, processing and interpretation. Collaboration between operators, vendors and academia will be required to meet surveillance needs in this low oil price environment. Also, an integrated approach drawing from a broad range of technologies including 4D seismic, 4D DAS VSP, gravity, magnetics and subsidence monitoring PMT nodes will be needed. The focus of this workshop will be on improving the economic viability of reservoir surveillance for offshore fields. Strategies will be divided into two broad themes: 1.) Acquiring the right data, based on business need, for less, and 2.) Realizing more value by multi-disciplinary data integration. Topics should include:

Acquiring the right data for less

  • Short Streamer Surveys
  • DAS 3D VSP
  • Small Marine Sources
  • On-demand monitoring with semi-permanent systems

Realizing more value with the data we have

  • Integrated interpretation through co-visualization
  • Fit for purpose predictive analytics 

This workshop will facilitate open discussion among operators, vendors and academia about experiences with these technologies, their relative merits and potential ways forward for generating value with a fit for purpose approach that meets our surveillance demands in the current economic environment.

THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED

8:30 a.m.-12 p.m.
Organizer: Christof Stork
E-mail contact: Christof.Stork@iongeo.com 
Through the support of the SEG Research Committee

This event has been cancelled.

8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Organizers: Norm Allegar, M. Verliac and Nick Moldoveanu
E-mail contact: norm.c.allegar@exxonmobil.com 
Through the support of the SEG Research Committee

The primary objective of geophysics is to sufficiently sample the subsurface in order to produce accurate 3D images and obtain reliable rock properties. In today’s challenging economic climate, the industry is under tremendous pressure to reduce costs and we need to step back and propose solutions that allow us to economically meet our geophysical needs. The intent of this workshop is to share learnings and be willing to discuss not only where things went well, but also where the results were unanticipated or unwelcome. A cross-section of contractors and O&G companies will lead discussions and present case histories that describe innovations that they feel can improve the way we do business. The goal is to challenge conventional thinking and explore what could be the solutions of the future, both for marine and land.

8:30 a.m.-12 p.m.
Organizers: Raghu Chunduru and G. Amruthapuri
E-mail contact: raghu.chunduru@shell.com 
Through the support of the SEG Research Committee

Pre-drill and real-time pore pressure prediction (PPP) plays an important role in safe drilling of exploration and development wells. The deep play exploration becoming focus of the major E&P companies and one of the key challenges are high pressures and temperatures. In this workshop, we would like to include latest best practices of pre-drill pore pressure prediction in HPHT environments, well site monitoring, shallow hazards, new technologies, basin modeling, pressure in complex stress regimes, and implications for geomechanics.  We encourage every operator and relevant service companies to participate in this important technical workshop for the obvious benefits to industry in reducing risks to the health and safety of rig workers and the environment.  

8:30 a.m.-12 p.m.
Organizers: Stephen Wilson, Jim Rutledge and Dave Diller
E-mail contact: Stephen.Wilson@seismogenic.com 
Through the support of SEG Development and Production Committee

Microseismic events during hydraulic fracture (HF) stimulation are caused by the interaction of hydraulic fractures with existing discontinuities, changes in fluid pressure and changes in rock stress.

Events proximal to the HF provide an estimate of the size and extent of the stimulated volume. More distal events driven by the efficient transfer of pressure change through connected fracture networks provide different information. Differentiating between the proximal and the more distal events is not straightforward and has resulted in much confusion amongst end-users of microseismic information. We need to be able to distinguish between such events, and clarify which discontinuities are slipping and how. Answering these questions is important to how fracture permeability is created, how one might infer proppant placement, and how and when discrete fracture networks can be derived or constrained by microseismicity.

Recent interpretations suggest that bedding-plane slip may be the dominant microseismic mechanism for many stimulations in unconventional shale reservoirs. One implication of the bedding-plane slip interpretation is that the microseismicity directly gives the extension fracture(s) location and orientation, wherever detectable slip is generated along particular bedding interfaces. Inversion for an appropriate mechanism may also allow inferences to be made about both displacement along bedding and the dimension of extension fracture opening.

We intend to put the work back in workshop, with active participation from everyone. Speakers include:

  • Dave Diller, NanoSeis;
  • Ted Urbancic, ESG
  • Julia Gale, University of Texas
  • Shawn Maxwell, iMaGE
  • Frantisek Stanek, Seismik
  • Jim Rutledge, Schlumberger
  • Tom Bratton, Sigma3 

The workshop will include time for Q&A panel sessions and a 30 minute breakout session which will address the importance of mechanism on interpretation. All attendees are expected to contribute to discussion and attend the workshop for its duration.

8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Organizers: Jean Legault
E-mail contact: jean@geotech.ca 
Through the support of the SEG Mining and Geothermal Committee

Our one-day workshop will examine airborne induced polarization from inductive electromagnetic measurements in mineral exploration, presented by speakers that represent the leading experts in industry and academia from around the world. The topics discussed will include: History & Theory, Physical Property & Ground Geophysical Links, Data Processing, Synthetic Modeling & Inversion, and Mineral Exploration Case-Studies – capped off by a Processing & Inversion “Shoot Out” using a shared mineral exploration AEM data set. Talks will use a short 15 min format for fast pace, followed by round-table discussions with speakers after the morning and afternoon sessions. Join us for what plans to be the definitive discussion on the current state-of-the-art in airborne induced polarization, with an opportunity to learn and share with the world’s best on this exciting topic.

8:30 a.m.-12 p.m.
Organizers: Eric von Lunen and Naomi Bones
E-mail contact: ericvonlunen@yahoo.com 
Through the support of the SEG Oil and Gas Reserves Committee

We will focus on current industry perspectives of geophysical technology in proven and probable reserve/ resource volume prediction and its ultimate valuation.

This year's workshop will discuss and possible interview speakers from sister professional societies involved in estimate reserve/ resource volume.

The topics will include a round table on reserve prediction error and uncertainties in 3 basic concepts used including:

  • Decline curve analysis
  • Rate transit analysis
  • Reservoir characterization

 

In terms of geophysical technology currently applied and some misunderstood perceptions.

An open discussion on what is "reliable technology", its current view by other professional societies and actual status of current geophysical methodology.

Update on current activity within SPE/AAPG and SEG on PRMS revisions underway and likely to accepted guidelines we hope to see finalized in 2017.

8:30 a.m.-12 p.m.
Organizers: Josef Paffenholz and John Ferguson
E-mail contact: jpaffenholz@fairfieldnodal.com 
Through the support of the SEG Advanced Modeling Committee

This workshop will report on preliminary results from the SEAM Time-Lapse Project, an ambitious modeling study of the evolution of pore pressure and its detectability by geophysical remote sensing during hydrocarbon production. The geologic and reservoir model chosen for the project covers an offshore region about 12.5 by 12.5 km in lateral extent and 5 km in depth (with the water layer) and includes a series of stacked turbidite fans, which formed part of the SEAM Phase I model of Tertiary Basins in the Gulf of Mexico. One of the goals of the project was to advance the state of the art in realistic modeling of time-lapse studies by maintaining consistency in the representation of the underlying model in the different numerical simulations computing geophysical responses (seismic and non‑seismic), reservoir fluid flow, and geomechanical deformation. One of the ways this is being achieved is by using finite-element gridding and numerical techniques for all simulations. The SEAM project team, along with the partners selected for the project, will report on (1) the design and implementation of the geologic and reservoir model, (2) the production scenario used for the time-lapse study, and (3) the full suite of numerical modeling, including the initial geophysical simulations, the fully coupled reservoir flow and geomechanical simulations, the updating of the physical property models, and the final geophysical simulations.

8:30-12 p.m.
Organizers: Felix J. Herrmann, Sven Treitel, Vanessa Brown and Partha Routh
E-mail contact: fherrmann@eos.ubc.ca 
Through the support of the SEG Research Committee

Seismic inversion is an ill-posed problem. All currently used inversion algorithms are at best approximations. As a result, we face the problem that many models of the subsurface produce synthetic data, all of which fit the data within a given measure of error. In this workshop we ask what are and what can be appropriate uses of this rapidly evolving FWI technology? What are and will remain inherent limitations when applied in practical setting?  We have a set of invited speakers discussing methodologies such as, but not limited to, current FWI applications, elastic FWI, global methods, constrained methods, alternative objective functions and micro seismic.

Program

Part 2

A new FWI gradient for deep-model updating using an Inverse Scattering Imaging Condition by Nizar Chemingui and Sverre Brandsberg-Dahl (PGS)

Constrained FWI by Felix J. Herrmann (the University of British Columbia)

How much do acquisition parameters influence the design of data preprocessing workflow and FWI strategy? by A. Adamczyk, A. Górszczyk, M. Malinowski (Institute of Geophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences)

Microseismic Event Estimation via Elastic Full Waveform Inversion by Jordan Kaderli, Susan E. Minkoff, and Matthew D. McChesney (UT Dallas)

Mathematical model constraints to overcome geological challenges for FWI by Tim Lin (Sub Salt Ltd)

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